Show and Tell Friday: Show V. Tell

“Read, read, read. Read everything — trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it.
Then write. If it’s good, you’ll find out. If it’s not, throw it out of the window.”
— William Faulkner

Show and Tell Friday: Show V. Tell and all that writing Hell made easy.

Chances are if you’re a writer you’ve heard the phrase ‘show don’t tell’ more times than you can count. If you’re anything like me, you probably want to bash your head against a solid surface. (Disclaimer, please don’t go around bashing your head. Your writing will not benefit from this. Keep writing. You’ll get it.)

Showing is probably the hardest thing to grasp…

…And just when you think you’ve finally got the concept down, a whole new Hell opens up. That’s right The Mid-Ground. That horrible little Purgatory where you’re half showing and half telling. Let me just say, there’s no place worse than Purgatory. Really. Being stuck in between is all kinds of ick.

But, luckily there are agents out there like the fabulous Mary Kole of Andrea Brown Lit. who offer up advice. Mighty fine advice too, might I add. So I’m going to share her post with you in case you missed it. It’s definitely worth looking at.

If you want the low down on showing click on the link HERE to be redirected to Mary’s blog. Go on and click it. Your writing and characters will thank you.

Happy Friday! Hope you have a wonderful weekend. See you back here on Monday. XO


It’s my blog-o-versary, and I got you something perdy…

Holy crap, today is my one year blog-o-versary!!! Time seriously flies, whether you’re having fun, or not tweeties. (KIDDING! No hate mail pleaseee.) I can’t believe we’ve reached WELL into five digit page hits, and have over 3,300 friends/followers/lurkers/cool kids on twitter. (Especially since the blog REALLY only got going during the summer.)

It’s truly mind blowing, and really humbling. For realsies. XOXO

So in honor of all YOU faithful readers, todays post is all yours. Here are some fun quotes for all you tweeps who make my heart beat three sizes larger, a whopping 365 days a year.

  • A friend is one who knows you and loves you just the same. Elbert Hubbard
  • Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence. George Washington
  • Let us be grateful to people who make us happy, they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom. Marcel Proust
  • Don’t walk behind me; I may not lead. Don’t walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend. Albert Camus
  • The sincere friends of this world are as ship lights in the stormiest of nights. Giotto di Bondone

Thank you for continuing to read, and peruse the blog each & every day. Hope you enjoyed the quotes, but now it’s time for me to get back to work on some book edits. There’s no rest for the wicked –  so please go have a shot for me.

Here’s to the last year, and cheers to the next tweethearts!!!

— XO —

Kerri

Extra, extra

The very talented Eileen Andrews has been interviewing writers and getting an insiders look at where the writing magic happens. Guess who she interviewed? So if any of you charming lil’ lurkers want a look inside my writing space, check out the interview here.

Here’s some of the interview, with just one teaser pic. You’ll have to check out the link for all the photos and the entire interview.

<33333333333333 

Photo by Kerri Maniscalco

The Interview

What’s the most important thing about your writing environment? Does it change regularly? Or do you require consistency?

I’m a closet romantic, so the overall atmosphere is the most important thing about my writing environment. I light candles, keep favorite books close, and start typing.

Some days I’ll switch it up and write in bed – just to be daring. As much as I enjoy spontaneity in life, my work environment remains pretty consistent.

Do you have a writing talisman? Something to jump you into writing?

Usually I’ll think of Jack London. Which sounds weird, but he said ‘You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.’

So that’s exactly what I do now. I’ve gotten into the habit of writing every single day, even when I don’t feel ‘inspired.’ Amazingly, it works.

Are you an evening or a daytime writer? What’s your writing schedule like?

I’m a day into evening writer. Typically I write between eight and fourteen hours a day, six or seven days a week. Though, lately I’ve been trying for a more regular schedule to avoid getting burnt out.

Ideally I’d love to write Monday through Friday for eight to ten hours a day. But I’m not very good at that whole cutting back thing just yet.

Are you a pantster or a plotter? What do you like about your method?

I’m a balls-out kinda girl, so it depends on what project I’m working on. The first book I wrote I was a complete pantster, and loved it. But with the second novel, I crafted a query letter first, then tried to make it work around that. I enjoy plotting basically for the challenge it provides.

It’s like‘Okay, I’ve got an idea of what I’d like to do, but can I make it work on paper? Am I going to fail miserably? Is this a terrible idea?’ I love the feeling in the end when it all comes together. Then of course I start looking for the next challenge right away.

Do you have a favorite book on writing? What made it so helpful?

I don’t have a favorite book on writing per se. I took creative writing in high school and college, but I think reading in your genre (and as many other books as you can) is the most helpful tool any writer can call upon.

I recently bought a book about forensics for writers, which I enjoyed. So technically that could be my favorite book on writing. Today…

What book or author has had the greatest impact on your writing career?

This is a REALLY hard question. Lilian Jackson Braun, Sue Grafton and Janet Evanovich are a few contemporary mystery authors I just started reading. Shakespeare, Poe, Hemingway, Salinger, Frost & Dante have been longtime favorites. Kerouac’s Mexico City Blues is something I re-read periodically. Shel Silverstein is an author I was obsessed with as a kid.

I’ve also been reading The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides – it’s just amazing. I wouldn’t know where to begin with deciding the greatest influence! Basically they’ve all impacted my writing in some weird, eclectic way.

What author would you break the law to meet?

Find out my answer by checking out the link HERE.